Today’s #Picture to Inspire Your Imagination: 03/August/21

Enjoy!
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These images are intended as a source of entertainment, joy, and inspiration for the imagination.
You can view more of my pictures in my Gallery.

12 thoughts on “Today’s #Picture to Inspire Your Imagination: 03/August/21

  1. Pingback: Today’s #Picture to Inspire Your Imagination: 03/August/21 | In the Net! – Pictures and Stories of Life

    1. Thanks, Lynette. We dashed in here, following a local lady who’d just parked her car and ran inside out of the sudden downpour. We’d spent the morning at the Arras War Memorial, signing my name in the visitors’ book on behalf of my elderly Aunt Vera who was unable to make the trip but had always wanted to commemorate the death of her father, my grandfather, during WWI. Having found his name on the monument, and commemorated it with a photo for her, we had walked back to catch our train back to Paris, when the skies opened. We stopped and had a lovely meal in this café, where they spoke no English. Best meal we had in France, and the house wine was lovely. They treated us like royalty as soon as Valerie spoke to them in French. A great experience after a sad visit.
      The café also served as a tobacconist and a bakery, hence the signs above the windows.

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        1. Valerie is one of those people who are able to pick up accents, and she speaks French and German. When we first went abroad together, to Rhodes, we were in a taverna, watching a football match on their big screen, and a German couple were sitting next to us. They asked a question, in German, and Valerie was able to reply. For the rest of the evening, she translated into German for them. The man could speak technical English for his job but not conversational English. They were a lovely couple and we spent a pleasant evening together. That was the first of many such experiences I’ve had while abroad with Valerie.

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          1. French was my first language (I grew up in a bilingual household). I learned German as an adult when I lived there. It’s always appreciated when visitors try to stretch themselves, even if it’s only please and thank you. I have been working on learning Chipewyan (one of our First Nations languages) but it has been slow.

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            1. I agree, Lynette. It’s always been our experience that an attempt to speak the language, no matter how poorly, is always appreciated when abroad. We’ve done that in Germany, France, Greece and Italy and it’s always appreciated. Valerie’s much better at it than me; she has a ‘good ear’, she had a school-arranged residential ‘swap’ visit to France as a teenager, and she lived in Germany for three years and learned their language by watching German versions of English TV programmes to begin with!
              I imagine learning any of the First Nations languages would be difficult. But I bet you’ll do well in the end.

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    1. It’s all one establishment, Brenda. A cafe, or bistro. The signs above the windows advertise the sale and provision of tobacco and bread to customers. The rooms above are where the owners live. The cafe is situated one one side of a small town square, mostly used for parking.

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