Fantasticon 2020

Each year, Dan Grubb and his publishing company, Fantastic Books Publishing, run a Fantasticon event in England. Always a great place for fantasy, sci-fi, gamers, readers of all sorts, and those who simply enjoy a bit of fun. This year, 2020, the Covid 19 pandemic has prevented such events going ahead because of social distancing …

Continue reading Fantasticon 2020

Overstrike, by CM Angus: #BookReview.

373 pages Time Travel/Science Fiction/Alternative History Thoughtful, engaging science fiction with a real handle on a scientific topic is less common than might be expected, bearing in mind the name of the genre. But Overstrike is a great example of how it can be done well. Looking at themes of free will and ethics, and …

Continue reading Overstrike, by CM Angus: #BookReview.

Nexus, by Joshua Grant: #BookReview.

389 pages YA/Science Fiction If you enjoy science fiction packed with action, humour and credible characters, but overlain with emotional content to make you care what happens to those characters, this is for you. So many scifi thrillers concentrate on plot, action, with little attention given to the players. This book contains all the elements …

Continue reading Nexus, by Joshua Grant: #BookReview.

Periphery, by Michael Winter: #BookReview.

383 pages First Contact Science Fiction/Horror Tense. Taut. Engaging. Absorbing. It happens to all of us, and those with imagination are especially vulnerable: the situation and/or location carry some element of unfamiliarity. There, in the shadows under the tree, near the open gate, behind the stone wall, we see, or think we see, from the …

Continue reading Periphery, by Michael Winter: #BookReview.

When Your #SciFi Predictions Come True!

When I wrote The Methuselah Strain, one of my major themes was the influence of sex robots on the human population; in particular, the dangers involved in employing such robots fitted with Artificial Intelligence. Now scientists have decided to voice and share their own fears in this regard. It’s really rather gratifying when you discover …

Continue reading When Your #SciFi Predictions Come True!

The Forge: Fire and Ice, by Fantastic Books Publishing: #BookReview.

236 pages Short Stories/Fantasy/Science Fiction Anthologies Before you read this, you need to know that one of the 27 stories published in this anthology was written by me. So, a collection of dark, sometimes very dark, speculative fiction with a touch of black humour sprinkled in. The theme of the anthology is Fire and Ice …

Continue reading The Forge: Fire and Ice, by Fantastic Books Publishing: #BookReview.

The Fifth Ascendant, by Joshua Grant: #BookReview.

777 pages Children’s Steampunk/Fantasy and Magic for Children As this is a children’s book, I read it to find out how the author dealt with such a readership, having read other works of his written for adults. This is definitely written for a younger readership. There are elements some adults will find difficult to follow; …

Continue reading The Fifth Ascendant, by Joshua Grant: #BookReview.

By the Feet of Men, by Grant Price: #BookReview.

344 pages Science Fiction/Dystopian/Post-Apocalyptic This book was hard to put down, despite pressing calls on my time. Yes, it’s science fiction (which some readers disparage from ignorance). Yes, it’s dystopian and post-apocalyptic, which brings it into line with the current belated surge of interest in climate change, now recognised as an emergency. The story revolves …

Continue reading By the Feet of Men, by Grant Price: #BookReview.

Echoes of Olympus Mons, by Eric Malikyte: #BookReview.

270 Pages Horror/Science Fiction It takes imagination and sound scientific knowledge to invent an entirely new form of monstrous antagonist in a science fiction novel, and Eric Malikyte has both in quantity. This is a book that manages to engage the reader despite the self-imposed social isolation of the main protagonist and narrator. Other characters …

Continue reading Echoes of Olympus Mons, by Eric Malikyte: #BookReview.

Why Did I Write Generation Mars This Way?

Earlier today I received an email from a visitor to this site, explaining he couldn’t review my Generation Mars series of books because he found the first one, Blood Red Dust, too distressing. His comments prompted a response from me to explain why I’d written the books in the way I did. It occurred to …

Continue reading Why Did I Write Generation Mars This Way?