Today’s #Picture Inspiring Imagination: 17/August/21

Queueing for the Colloseum

Enjoy!
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11 thoughts on “Today’s #Picture Inspiring Imagination: 17/August/21

  1. Pingback: Today’s #Picture Inspiring Imagination: 17/August/21 | In the Net! – Pictures and Stories of Life

  2. Of course, I have never been to Europe so I didn’t know what I was seeing except a crown of people, which now in America is a NO NO! It seems like lately, EVERYTHING is a no-no! It looks beautiful and fun and I am so looking forward to it in the near future. Thanks for posting.

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    1. Rome is a fascinating place, Brenda, where the modern and the ancient sit comfortably side by side. Our best times were after our evening meals, usually at an outdoor travatori, followed by an evening stroll in the balmy air, taking in the ancient remains accompanied by a free light show with associated appropriate music.
      Of course, our visit there was well before the pandemic, so no fear of infection!

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    1. Yes, Lynette, the crowds were a ‘problem’ in almost every place we visited, apart from the Palatine Hill, which is extensive and has room for lots of visitors to give each other space. The worst place was the Trevi Fountain, where Valerie’s claustrophobia made her remain on the edge of the are while I threaded my way through the mass to get to the edge of the stonework for a picture or two. The Colloseum has a strict limit on numbers inside at any one time, supposedly 3,000, but I’m not sure this is adhered to. As is the case everywhere nowadays, there are too many people to allow most popular places to give a real flavour of their attractions. I think the time will come in the near future when all such places are restricted in numbers. Then, of course, in most situations, only the wealthy will be able to visit.

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      1. I’m not big on crowds and will walk away rather than endure them (if I have a choice). I have wondered for a long time now how much work has to be done with these historical buildings or locations to offset the damage from the numbers. It must be extreme. Agreed – some places, if not most, will have to be restricted, and then they will only be accessed by the wealthy.

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        1. Perhaps, in environmental terms, a reduction in such travel should be encouraged, Lynette? Many tourists fly long distance to such destinations, and that can’t be good for the planet. I fear we face some pretty stringent changes in our lifestyles over the coming decades. I’m just glad we had the opportunity before it became so obvious that we must all seriously consider how, where, and when we travel. The future remains a deeply unknown place.

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          1. I agree, Stuart. I obviously know very well how much fossil fuel even a small plane can burn. They are huge polluters. The aircraft manufacturers are reading the writing on the wall, though, and electric planes will be coming soon, including types that can carry large numbers of passengers. Question is whether we should be doing this type of checklist travel at all; it still causes a lot of damage.

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            1. Electric planes; a partial solution, as you say. But it’ll take decades before all the old fossil fuel craft are decommissioned, and I’m pretty certain we don’t have decades.
              I absolutely agree about ‘checklist’ travel.

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  3. We were there in September and it was warm without being overpowering. A few thunderstorms, but nothing to stop our enjoyment. Definitely worth a visit. We took in Rome, Pompeii, Florence and Lake Maggiore on our visit. You’ll love it!

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