Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 49.

In this series, I've aimed at trimming our writing. I’ve tried to include examples that might seed ideas for your writing. Our readers will appreciate the absence of common redundancies and flabby expressions. This post, however, is the penultimate offering on the topic. Next, I’m going to be looking at expanding effective vocabulary by employing …

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Fear of Flying, by Erica Jong, Reviewed.

This book needs no more reviews; but I’m a compulsive reviewer, so here goes. I’m of the generation the author writes about in this modern classic and found so many points on which I was able to connect that it was like making a visit to my early home. However, my enjoyment of the period …

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Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 48.

Writers enjoy sharing ideas to improve our craft. This series aims at trim writing, using examples intended to stimulate the imagination. Readers will appreciate the absence of common redundancies and flabby expressions. Penetrate into: Is it possible to penetrate out of? No, I didn’t think so. e.g. At that exquisite moment of union, the man …

Continue reading Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 48.

Easter Walking in the Forest of Dean

Some places inspire. The Forest of Dean is one such place for me. Living within the forest, with access just a hundred yards or so from our front door, we have the opportunity to walk amongst the trees every day, and do our best to do just that. The weather has been very variable this …

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Synthesis, Published by Fantastic Books Publishing, Reviewed.

This anthology of science fiction stories by many different authors is a fantastic collection of disparate views of the future presented by creative talents. I must, however, before I expand on that summary, confess to my vested interest: I’m one of the authors. But, as a single voice among 27 stories, I feel justified in …

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The Ubiquity of Sacred Curses.

Are you ever stuck for a suitable expletive to place in the mouths of your characters? I’m currently writing a science fiction novel set in the near future on Mars. I’ve imagined a new world where, amongst other things, the society is effectively agnostic. In devising dialogue, I suddenly became aware of just how pervasive …

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Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 47.

We writers share ideas to improve our craft. This series aims to trim our writing. Readers will appreciate the absence of these common redundancies and flabby expressions. Joint collaboration: Let’s dispense with the ‘joint’, unless you feel the need for a fix, of course. All collaboration is a joint affair, after all. e.g. Joint collaboration …

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Is it Time to Re-evaluate our Attitude to Religious Freedoms?

From time to time, I feel compelled to express an opinion about some matter or other. As a writer, with my own blog, I consider this the most appropriate place for such things. Please join the discussion. And, if you’re easily offended, please avoid these topics. # It has happened again: a terrorist attack on …

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Collins Complete Guide to British Birds, by Paul Sterry, Reviewed.

Regular visitors to the blog will know I usually review works of fiction. But I also do this for nonfiction, when I think it'll be useful for readers. My recent move to the Forest of Dean has meant I've discovered species of bird unknown to me, so I bought this book to help my wife …

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Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 46.

We writers share ideas to improve our craft. This series aims to trim our writing. Readers will appreciate the absence of these common redundancies and flabby expressions. Meet with each other: If you’re getting together, you’re meeting. You don’t need ‘with each other’. e.g. They met with each other to discuss her offer. Try: They …

Continue reading Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 46.