Name a Character in my New Novel.

Characters are fundamental to my stories, as readers will know. I’m in the initial stages of writing a new science fiction novel, set on Mars. For a while, I’ve been beset by a mysterious barrier to getting on with the story. Lots of preparation, research, and reading round essential topics of interest. And I have …

Continue reading Name a Character in my New Novel.

Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 31.

Writers enjoy sharing ideas to improve their craft. Here are some ways to trim our writing. Readers will appreciate us removing common redundancies and flabby expressions. Completely engulfed: When something is engulfed, it’s completely enclosed in whatever is engulfing it, so ‘completely’ is a tautology. e.g. The flames completely engulfed the high rise building. Try: …

Continue reading Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 31.

Whistles After Dark, by April Taylor, Reviewed.

This novella introduces amateur sleuth, Georgia Pattinson, early music soprano and a lady with guts. Sound a little specialist? Not a bit of it. Whilst there are references and interesting details relating to both her skill and the musical world she inhabits, this isn’t one of those elitist books that allows a special interest to …

Continue reading Whistles After Dark, by April Taylor, Reviewed.

Amazon: a Solution to the Review Problem?

Perhaps, Amazon can be persuaded to do something positive for authors who provide it with a living? The company currently has a policy preventing honest reviews from writers giving opinions on the books of other writers they may know. The whole policy is a sledgehammer to crack a walnut. It’s intended to prevent dishonest reviews …

Continue reading Amazon: a Solution to the Review Problem?

Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 30.

Writers enjoy sharing ideas to improve their craft. Here are some ways to trim our writing. Readers will appreciate us removing common redundancies and flabby expressions Completely eliminate: To eliminate is to remove entirely, so ‘completely’ is superfluous. e.g. If you want your dog to really love you, completely eliminate all competition for your attention. …

Continue reading Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 30.

The Mother Tongue, by Bill Bryson, Reviewed.

Subtitled, ‘English and How it Got That Way’, this is typical Bryson wit and erudition at his best. I confess, I was tempted initially to disagree with some of his numbers on the speaking of English, but a quick gander at Google soon put me right on that issue. The book is divided into 16 …

Continue reading The Mother Tongue, by Bill Bryson, Reviewed.

Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 29.

Writers enjoy sharing ideas to improve their craft. Here are some ways to trim our writing. Readers will appreciate us removing common redundancies and flabby expressions. Completely destroy: If you destroy something, it is shattered, demolished, pulled to pieces: in any case, it ceases to exist as it was before the act. ‘Completely’ is therefore …

Continue reading Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 29.

Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 28.

Writers enjoy sharing ideas to improve their craft. Here are some ways to trim our writing. Readers will appreciate us removing common redundancies and flabby expressions. Commute back and forth: You commute to get to and from work, so ‘back and forth’ is unnecessary. Unless, of course, you have the sense to live close to …

Continue reading Cut The Fat; Make Your Writing Lean: #Tip 28.

You can’t tell me what to do!

I agree with almost everything Dr Meg Sorick says here. Great piece that new writers in particular might want to read. Mind you, there are a few experienced writers who would benefit from this advice too!

Meg Sorick, Author/Artist

I came across this photo/list of Elmore Leonard’s Ten Rules of Writing on Pinterest. It’s an excerpt fromhisessay of the same title. I thought it would be interesting to see if you all agree or disagree with these rules.

BVWqlvwCAAE7ORr.jpg

Here’s my opinion:

1. Personally, I love a story that starts with “It was a dark and stormy night…” (just kidding, unless the author is trying to be ironic).

2. How about the prologue? Is there a bit of the story that just needs to be set off by itself? I’m pretty sure I’ve never had a problem with a prologue.

3.”Said” seems to have no grey area. Writers either demand that “said” be used exclusivelyor they hate having to stick to “said.” Some say it’s the mark of an inexperienced writer to use words other than “said.” Whatever. Sometimes, words like “whispered,” “murmured,”or “shouted” just need to be used, I…

View original post 272 more words

Updated Writing Contests Page

Just a quick message to know the table has been updated and you'll find it here. Good Luck!