Pride in Place? A #Poem

Image via Mapswire. Pride in Place? Born in slum or palaceyou have no say in youraccident of birthLocation status wealthof parents determineswhere you might emergeSo why so proud ofwhere this chance occurredYou made no choice hereIt was imposed on youPride in place is foolishWith no experienceof another placeyou can make nomeaningful comparisonYou merely echowhat was …

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The Fisherman and His Soul, by Oscar Wilde: #BookReview.

I read this short story by the famous playwright in the hope it would prove a better read than his ‘The Birthday of the Infanta’. My hope was based on ‘The Sphinx Without a Secret’ and ‘The Selfish Giant’, both of which I thoroughly enjoyed. Unfortunately, this moral tale is similar to the ‘Infanta’, in …

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The Birthday of the Infanta, by Oscar Wilde: #BookReview.

Very definitely a story of its time. It’s intended for children, but I seriously doubt many modern kids would read this. There are moral lessons buried here, but they are largely lost in the unnecessarily detailed descriptions of the riches of the royal family featured. Some of these are effectively lists of luxury items and …

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Somebody Else’s Troubles, by J.A. English: #BookReview.

389 Pages Literary Fiction. All serious works of fiction should carry at least one underlying message. Some manage this with such subtlety it barely makes a conscious impression on those not seeking it, others blare it out loudly, covering their story with a condescending layer of preaching. Many lie somewhere in between; a reasonable balance …

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84K, by Claire North: #BookReview.

480 pages Political Fiction/Dystopian/Literary Fiction Not for the faint-hearted. And, definitely not for the perennially depressed. But this is a book that should be read by everyone (I’m conscious of the contradiction). Set in a future UK too close for comfort, it examines the inevitable consequences of unfettered capitalism. The writing style is clever, sometimes …

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Exiles, by Daniel Blythe: #Book Review.

494 Pages Science Fiction/Children’s/Colonisation In this quite extraordinary novel we have a piece of science fiction that could well become a literary classic. The combination of figurative language, timeless universal themes, and adventure shown through the eyes of carefully realised and presented characters places this work high above many in the genre. In fact, it …

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Lost in a Good Book, by Jasper Fforde: #BookReview.

384 pages Literary Fiction/Time Travel/Adventure Stories and Action. Oddly, this book isn’t listed under comedy or humour on Amazon. I think, however, it’s supposed to be funny, perhaps witty? I confess I found it more irritating than amusing. Written in a style that makes the author appear self-congratulatory and strangely complacent as he waves the …

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As I Lay Dying, by William Faulkner: #BookReview.

400 pages Literary Classics When a book is as well-known as this classic, it’s difficult to know whether anything new can be said about it. But a review is a personal opinion and may help other readers yet to try the work, so here goes. The edition I bought (as part of a package bought …

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The #Write #Words? Post 1

A new series of posts about what words to use, and how. In this series, I’ll consider Onomatopoeia, Simile, and Collective Nouns. From time to time, I may include the odd reference to other word use, and I’ll continue my Delusional Dictionary. The last series, accessed through this link, dealt with Synonyms, Antonyms, Contronyms, Adverbs, …

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A Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. Le Guin: #BookReview.

304 pages Children’s/Science Fiction and Fantasy It may seem like an odd time of life to be reading children’s literature. In my defence, I bought this book ‘blind’ as one of a number I ordered after being gifted a book token for my 70th birthday. I’d heard of Ursula Le Guin, had her books recommended, …

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