Dealing with Difficult Themes in #Fiction

Word cloud Via Wordart In writing science fiction, two areas of uncertainty arise before the start. Assuming it’s not Space Opera, the first barrier is the large number of readers who believe all sci-fi involves space wars, forgetting that at least two of the most brilliant works of literature were also science fiction: Aldous Huxley’s …

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Time and the Conways, by J.B. Priestley: #BookReview.

Stage Play script. This exploration of family unity, loyalty and dishonesty is structured through three acts to use time as a clever ingredient of viewing, and attempting to predict, the future. It depicts a typical upper middle-class family of the era, showing the inherent snobbery, their patchy understanding of the world they occupy, and how …

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Translation: Illuminating Cultural Difference.

Just short of a month ago, I wrote a post about Helen, a Chinese woman, translating some of my stories into her language. My hope was that would place my work before a wider readership. But there has been an unexpected and positive additional outcome.I’m no linguist. But I’ve travelled, both within the land of …

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The Nature of Photographs, by Stephen Shore: #BookReview.

136 pagesPhotography Criticism & Essays This is a primer intended for students studying photography at university, but it has something useful to say to anyone interested in what photography truly is and how it can affect our view of the world. It sports numerous photographs to illustrate the textual points made, and explains how photography, …

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Wild Horses on the Salt, by Anne Montgomery: #BookReview.

345 pagesWomen’s Action & Adventure/Romance/Contemporary Fiction Having enjoyed Anne Montgomery’s ‘A Light in the Desert’, I thought I’d give this new novel a try. I’ve never been to the USA, and frequently find novels set there both self-congratulatory and full of references that are meaningless to me as a UK reader. But the previous novel …

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Pride of Place: a #Poem

Pride of Place I wonder why it may bethe casean accident of birthshould create such loyaltyto a place you had no say in choosing. You were at your birthof course.But did you choose your parents?Did you select the place, the mannerof your entrance to the world? It is possible you are loyalonlyout of love for …

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The Latest on the New Novel

Picture via Pixabay. Yesterday I received the final edit notes for the new novel. This was the copy edit part, where a super-observant editor with an excellent grasp of the rules of English, goes through the entire book with a fine-tooth comb and picks out all the nits and knots: spelling, punctuation, syntax, grammar, etc. …

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Crimes and Impunity in New Orleans, by Sherrie Miranda: #BookReview.

353 pages: Women’s Crime Fiction/Coming of Age Fiction/Women’s Contemporary Fiction (It should, perhaps, also be included in ‘Political and Historical Fiction) Subtitled ‘Shelly’s Journey Begins’, this book is a prequal to the authors debut thriller ‘Secrets and Lies in El Salvador’, which I’ve also read and reviewed. Both books are well worth anyone’s cash and …

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The Pleasures and Pains of #Editing.

It’s been a long slog, but it’s finally done! My latest novel deals with contentious themes and these proved a source of much discussion between me and my publisher’s editors. Usually, editing of my work has consisted in minor grammatical, structural and vocabulary changes. Nothing substantial, as the characters have always been accepted as well-rounded …

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Beyond Writing: Art of Choice #OpenBook Blog Hop

March 29, 2021If you weren’t an author, what other art would you likely pursue? Rules:1. Link your blog to this hop.2. Notify your following that you are participating in this blog hop.3. Promise to visit/leave a comment on all participants' blogs.4. Tweet/or share each person's blog post. Use #OpenBook when tweeting.5. Put a banner on …

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May at 101, a Poetical Memorial.

May, photographed by my stepdad in black and white and coloured by May with proper photo-colourings. May at 101 Too soon you left us.Your tender love binding all togethergone in a moment of driver madness.Mother, carer, advisor, confidante, best friendwho taught me love is better alwaysthan hate, indifference, and envy.What would you have doneonce all …

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Bridport Prize 2020 Anthology, by Bridport Arts Centre: #BookReview.

147 pages Literary Anthology This is an anthology of the winning entries for the poetry, short fiction, and flash fiction annual contest held in 2020. It includes the ‘commended’ entries, too.The Bridport is a well-respected international literary competition. Along with other contemporary creative activities, what is considered ‘good’ is down to personal taste. We’ve all …

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Edit Notes: How Do You Deal With Them?

Word cloud created through wordart.com Environment, Capitalism, and Religious Hypocrisy are major themes running through my WIP, a work my publisher’s team of editors recently returned with ‘edit notes’. This wasn’t the usual ‘line edit’ I’ve had in the past and, on reading the notes, I was initially taken aback. My first response was that …

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Futuristic Fiction: #Research for #Writers, Part 17; All the Rest.

Word cloud created via Wordart.com This series began as a way to suggest possible topics for research for those writing fiction set in the future on Earth. The list runs to 100, and so far, I’ve covered 16 in detail. However, it strikes me it might be more productive for writers to tackle those subjects …

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Futuristic Fiction: #Research for #Writers, Part 16, Climate.

The introduction to this series is here. This post looks at Climate. For most writers of future fiction, this is a no-brainer. We’ve made ourselves familiar with the science, understand the realities, know the world is utterly unprepared to deal with what is now correctly termed a ‘climate emergency’. We know governments, Big Business, led …

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