Today’s #Picture 06/July/21

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23 thoughts on “Today’s #Picture 06/July/21

  1. Pingback: Today’s #Picture 06/July/21 | In the Net! – Pictures and Stories of Life

    1. A lot of roads in the UK twist and turn, Brenda, so it’s no surprise the forest tracks do the same. Mind you, that’s often because they need to avoid steep drops, dense vegetation, or pools of water! You know what they say; ‘The rolling English drunkard made the rolling English roads.’!

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    1. We are so lucky to have such choice of paths from our door, Lynette. We’re taking part in a challenge to walk 1,000 miles in a year. So far we’ve covered 600 miles and all that without ever having to get in a car!

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    1. Yes, it attracted my attention, Cheryl, when we decided to take a slightly different route. Normally we travel along this path, as the right hand straight leads from the main road and the left hand one leads into the deeper forest. On this occasion, we had walked up a rather boggy and overgrown path that originates near the local fishing pond, so we saw the view from a new angle.

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  2. Wow Stuart you couldn’t find a more beautiful place to walk. The ferns, which are quite large in the center of the curve, grew everywhere in KY but I don’t remember ever seeing them that large. How beautiful. What a great place that would be to write. Hope all is well. Love to you both. ❤️🤗

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    1. Yes, Joni, the ferns, as well as the bracken, have grown very well this year due to a combination of mild weather and rather a lot of rain! The ferns are a mixture of maiden fern and male fern, though both names are misnomers, as all ferns are hermaphrodites! The path leads from our crossing of the main road and into a large area of the forest which is full of paths that criss-cross the place and lead to all sorts of lovely sights. I wouldn’t want to sit and write there, though, as the path is wide enough to attract mountain bikers, and they are not always caring enough to warn pedestrians of their speeding travel!

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      1. Oh too bad. I may be wrong but I think you told me that you don’t have to worry about ticks like we do. I don’t think you could keep me from sitting in those woods if I lived there. You are truly blessed to have such an amazing place to walk with and be with your wife. Your photography is gorgeous and so your gallery is so lovely. Right now I have all my own printed and framed work in the closet because I truly thought we would move but we are not sure now. I did not know that about the ferns, thank you, they just took me right back to those days in KY while I was in nursing school. Love ❤️ J

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        1. We get ticks, and their wonderful gift of Limes disease, but we carry tick removal tools with us and have never had to use them.
          There are many places where ferns and bracken are absent, and those are places we would sit and drink in the atmosphere and spirit of the forest, Joni. You’re right, we’re truly blessed to live in such a place.
          Maybe time to get your inspirational artwork back on display, Joni. I thought you’d decided to stay put?

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          1. Oh we go back and forth about the move Stuart. I am disappointed that you have to worry about ticks, I can’t stand them. They carry so many diseases many people have probably never even heard of as well. Thank you for your very kind words about my photography Stuart. So glad you have that place. Nature is something our generation will be enjoying for a long time, it will last that long. However he is an interesting fact. When we lived in the Tri-Cities in Washington State before moving to Seattle it would get 100 degrees and stay that way for four days some times. Now all these years later it was 118 degrees there the other day and this is happening all over. I am so glad I am not there, it is so hot here that Scott and I have to stay in the house after noon because I can’t take the heat. I miss the hikes in the lush areas and mountains in the Puget Sound where we hiked. Thank you for your very kind compliment on my photography Stuart, you are such an amazing photographer it means a lot. Sending you both big hugs, xoxoxo Joni

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            1. They’re referring to the heatwave in Canada and the USA as a 1 in a 1,000 year event that was only possible because of climate change. Let’s hope more of the populations of both lands take note and start to alter their lifestyles, eh?
              You and Scott are wise to remain indoors (aircon, hopefully?) in the heat. It is a killer for some people. We’re still around the 20C (68F) mark here, but having more rain, often in the form of storms, than usual. Every month that passes we are informed by our national meteorological dept. that some weather record has been broken; either temperature, drought, rainfall, or storms. Makes you wonder what some people will need before they realise the climate emergency is a real thing.

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              1. Very interesting Stuart that statistic is staggering. I truly believe for some people it will take half the CA coast to be underwater, which is sad but any major catastrophe event could push climate change ahead by years, and it would have a significant ripple impact on the rate of devastation in our world. You all keep cool and safe. Love and hugs to you both. ❤️🤗😘

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                1. Knowing how resistant some people are to simple facts, Joni, I’ve used climate change as a major theme in my latest novel. I use my writing to inform as well as to entertain. My scifi series, Generation Mars employs the theme, too. It’s my way of trying to get the information out there.

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