Today’s Pictures: 11 Dec 20

A stand of birch on a knoll in the Forest of Dean.

Sharing this post widely on social media will allow those who are stuck indoors, due to Covid 19, to enjoy it. It will also reach more people and, hopefully, illustrate what a wonderful place our world is. With luck, between us, we might restore love and respect for nature and slow down the destructive urge to ruin our environment. Thank you.

The rocky coast, near Sissi, on the Greek island of Crete. Taken July 2008.

If you enjoy my pictures, you may be interested in my gallery, which you can find here or through the ‘Gallery’ tab at the top of the page.

13 thoughts on “Today’s Pictures: 11 Dec 20

  1. That’s great, Lynette. The brine, that is! But -30C – I don’t think I could live in such a place. I think the worst I’ve ever experienced was a few years back when we had -15C, and the water pipe in our garage burst, flooding the washing machine! Now, that was a cold job, finding the stopcock to turn off the freezing water shooting from the fractured pipe!
    Stay safe, warm and well.

    Like

  2. Pingback: Today’s Pictures: 11 Dec 20 — Stuart Aken | In the Net! – Stories of Life and Narcissistic Survival

  3. See this is what we were just talking about climate change my friend. At least the time traveler have some happy memories looking at your wonderful photography. I love Birch trees with their lovely white. Thank you my dear friends. 🤗💕❤️🦋

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That particular copse of birch is one we pass quite often. There’s something about the arrangement of the trees and the way the light falls there that catches my eye almost every time we pass them, Joni.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. The first photo reminds me a lot of my home in British Columbia. The winter in the Okanagan Valley is very mild – similar to the UK (not at all like where I work; -30C expected this weekend).

    I can smell the brine in the second photo. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s great, Lynette. The brine, that is! But -30C – I don’t think I could live in such a place. I think the worst I’ve ever experienced was a few years back when we had -15C, and the water pipe in our garage burst, flooding the washing machine! Now, that was a cold job, finding the stopcock to turn off the freezing water shooting from the fractured pipe!
      Stay safe, warm and well.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. A burst water pipe? Yuck! One thing that people do here in the older homes that may not be well insulated is to leave a very thin stream of water running in the kitchen. Running water doesn’t freeze, of course, and can be a temporary solution if that happens again.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. There should be a “Love” button. The first one looks like Birch trees in Maine and the Coastline reminds me of some of the areas on the Maine coastline. A hundred years ago we used to camp out on an Island on the coast, dig clams and cook them over an open flame. That is not possible anymore. We didn’t know how privileged we were. Thanks for the memories, Stuart.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. A ‘Like’ is good enough for me, Brenda.
      It’s great the pics have rekindled good memories. We have a lot of birch in the forest, mostly ‘rough birch’, but some ‘silver birch’, too. They tend to be the first trees to populate ground that’s been disturbed by industry, and this area was once full of mines, quarries and iron works. You have to really search for the odd remaining bits of industrial archaeology now, as it’s a hundred years or so since most of the work ceased. Nature soon takes over when humanity leaves the land alone, I’m pleased to note.

      Liked by 1 person

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