Today’s Picture: 16 Sep 20

A green valley in the Forest of Dean, contrasting the shade under the trees against the brightness of sunshine in the open.

Probably our last hot day of the year. So, today I give you a lush, steeply-sloping, narrow valley in the Forest of Dean, leading down to the section of woodland and brook fenced off to protect Beavers introduced a while ago. A small pilot trial to test the effectiveness of these marvellous little engineers on the waters of the brook, hoping to reduce the flooding that caused damage a few years ago. So far, their work has proved remarkably successful. Let’s hope they thrive.

If you’re visiting here, please be generous to those who can’t escape their own four walls at present, and share this widely with them on social media, so they can enjoy it. Thank you.

14 thoughts on “Today’s Picture: 16 Sep 20

  1. Pingback: Today’s Picture: 16 Sep 20 | In the Net! – Stories of Life and Narcissistic Survival

  2. Beavers are wonderful. So good to hear that they have been re-introduced to territory that used to be theirs. No surprise that in causing such environmental and animal destruction we are causing our own, too. I hope your new residents thrive.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Me, too, Lynette. So far, we haven’t caught site of them. The stream runs through a narrow valley that has been well fenced, to keep out wild boar and the idiots who believe they know better than the experts! But evidence of their activity is clear, even from the path beside the fence. We can see their lodge and one of their dams. Fortunately, the Forestry Commission is running the trial in connection with a specialist group of naturalists, so they should be fine. They’re tagged, and there are motion-sensitive cameras in place around the whole site.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wow! So many precautions! We have beavers everywhere here, of course (one of our national symbols). In the middle of Penticton there is a sort of slough (the river that used to be there was re-routed back in colonial times) and the beavers love it. Some people wanted to move them, but common sense won out and the beavers are now protected, including from the two busy roads that are nearby. I like taking a walk and seeing them there, beavering away. The kits sound like human babies.

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        1. We have our fair share of idiots in the UK, people who will blame wildlife for anything they don’t understand. And, since they were made extinct several centuries ago, the naturalists want to ensure they survive and breed in safety, Lynette. We’re hoping that once they’re fully established, they’ll remove the fence and allow them to roam.

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  3. What a gorgeous photograph. How fascinating about the beaver introduction to help protect the lands from flooding. What a great idea and I am delighted that it is helping. They are fascinating engineers as you said my friend. Thanks for the photograph. Hugs 🤗 to you both Joni

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Joni. Beavers were completely wiped out in the UK many centuries ago. Their problem was that every single part of a beaver can be used for something. So, with the usual human habit of greed without thought, hunters pursued them to extinction. A few years ago, they were re-introduced, I think from Germany, to trial flooding defences for Scotland. Their work did a lot of good (though some land owners grumbled about the wet in their woodlands – usually places few people visited). The pair here in the forest were brought in as the village, which follows a narrow valley down to the River Wye, was badly flooded a few years ago. The civil engineers rebult the culvert carrying the brook but that was felt likely to be insuufficient now that we are suffering greater weather extremes. The pair had to be replaced when it was discovered they might carry a specific parasite. They were replaced earlier this year and have now produced the first kit, so we’re hopeful they will form a little colony.

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      1. That is such a sweet story. Not the flooding of course but I love the idea of the new introduction and that they have a family.
        By the way, I don’t have a kindle account as I like the touch and feel of books. However I downloaded the kindle app on my phone and downloaded the kindle version of your book through Amazon. It is very intriguing already and very well written. I am reading about Luce passing gas. I like that you put humor in your book, I think I am really going to like her character. Thanks Stuart. You all have an amazing day. Hopefully you will get a photograph of those beavers some time. I am looking forward to reading your book. Lots of hugs, Joni

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        1. There’s a little more to it, Joni. The initial pair had to be replaced. The experts found a new female and placed her in the large enclosure. Then they sought a mate for her. Beavers mate for life. They found a male and popped it in with her, then discovered it was already one of a pair, so had to catch him and return him to his ‘wife’! It took a few weeks before they found the male that’s now with the female, but it had a happy ending.
          The book is available as a hardback, Joni, but only through the publisher, and that would incur a fairly hefty postage cost for you. I use a Kindle, especially when I go on holiday, as it saves me having to pack half a dozen or more paperbacks. But I prefer to read from print when I can. Hope you continue to enjoy the book.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. That is fascinating my friend. How interesting, I did not know they mated for life. I am so glad the scientists stuck with the project and it is helping. It wasn’t going to have just any old beaver.
            I am enjoying your book. I am in awe of how many you have written. I have a couple of friends that will read a couple of books a week and kindle totally makes since. At least I was able to buy it and can enjoy it on-line. Have an amazing day you two. ❤️Joni

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Thank you, Joni. I’ve been writing for a long time, though not quite as long as I’ve been taking photographs (I started that at the age of 11). Glad you’re enjoying the book.
              Have a great day.

              Liked by 1 person

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