Heaven’s Mirror, by Graham Hancock & Santha Faiia: #BookReview.

332 Pages Nonfiction Hardback Subtitled ‘Quest for the Lost Civilisation’, this book led to a major TV series on the UK’s Channel 4 network. Published in 1998, some of the content may now be a little out of date, as archaeological work is constantly updating information based on finds. The book is an attempt to …

Continue reading Heaven’s Mirror, by Graham Hancock & Santha Faiia: #BookReview.

The Nature of Photographs, by Stephen Shore: #BookReview.

136 pagesPhotography Criticism & Essays This is a primer intended for students studying photography at university, but it has something useful to say to anyone interested in what photography truly is and how it can affect our view of the world. It sports numerous photographs to illustrate the textual points made, and explains how photography, …

Continue reading The Nature of Photographs, by Stephen Shore: #BookReview.

A Perfect Planet, by Huw Cordey: #BookReview.

324 pagesPhysical Geography/Oceanography This book, a physical reminder of the excellent BBC TV series of the same name, was written by the Series Producer. Subtitled ‘Our One in a Billion World Revealed’, it is an account of the journeys made by the team of camera operators, production staff and other essential crew during the making …

Continue reading A Perfect Planet, by Huw Cordey: #BookReview.

The Photograph as Contemporary Art, by Charlotte Cotton: #BookReview.

248 pages Photography Criticism & Essays/Photography Reference/Digital Art. This is an examination of photography employed as a contemporary art medium as things stood approaching 2009 (there’s an updated version from Aug 2020). There has been an ongoing discussion about the validity of photography as a means of such self-expression. Hopefully, that argument has long been …

Continue reading The Photograph as Contemporary Art, by Charlotte Cotton: #BookReview.

Depolarized, by Nick Airus: #BookReview.

272 pagesPerspectives on Law/Government/Civil Liberties & Political Activism Subtitled ‘Transcending the False Left, Right Narrative’ this book is basically a plea for rational discussion to replace the current fashion for polemic and knee-jerk reactions to so many disagreements. It is also much more than this. The world seems to have descended into extreme factions, if …

Continue reading Depolarized, by Nick Airus: #BookReview.

Our Future Earth, by Curt Stager: #BookReview.

320 pagesGlobal Warming and Ecology/Ecological Pollution/Higher Education in Geography. Subtitled, The Next 100,000 Years of Life on the Planet, this book takes the view of that future as seen through the eyes of a paleoecologist, a term so new it doesn’t even appear in my edition of my usual go-to dictionary, the SOED. It describes …

Continue reading Our Future Earth, by Curt Stager: #BookReview.

The Book Review Companion, by David Wogahn: #BookReview.

212 pagesPublishing and Books/Writing Reference/Writing Skills Reference. Subtitled ‘An Author’s Guide to Getting and Using Book Reviews’, this is manual designed to do what the title suggests. Unfortunately, in common with a number of other books offering similar advice, it has little new to say about fiction, concentrating mainly on nonfiction. This isn’t a fault …

Continue reading The Book Review Companion, by David Wogahn: #BookReview.

21 Lessons for the 21st Century, by Yuval Noah Harari: #BookReview.

416 pages Political History and Theory/Evolutionary Psychology This is an unusually truthful book, written in rational prose with a degree of honesty that will startle most readers. Presented in five parts, entitled, The Technological Challenge, The Political Challenge, Despair and Hope, Truth, and Resilience, with each section further divided, it does what it states in …

Continue reading 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, by Yuval Noah Harari: #BookReview.

The Blind Watchmaker, by Richard Dawkins: #BookReview.

340 pagesBiological Evolution/Biology/Higher Education of Biological Sciences I came late to this seminal work, published 1986; a somewhat turbulent and formative period in my life. Wishing I’d read it at the time is pointless but nevertheless the case. It requires a special type of academic brilliance, combined with a good deal of experience, to tackle …

Continue reading The Blind Watchmaker, by Richard Dawkins: #BookReview.

the little book of humanism, by Andrew Copson and Alice Roberts: #BookReview.

254 pages Science and Religion/Ethics and Morality/Practical and Motivational Self Help This book, subtitled, ‘Universal lessons on finding purpose, meaning and joy’ encapsulates ideas I’d already formed from life experience, wide reading, and a deep love of the natural world. Every religion has its individual text, presented as a guide for how to live your …

Continue reading the little book of humanism, by Andrew Copson and Alice Roberts: #BookReview.

Amazon Decoded, by David Gaughran: #BookReview.

326 Pages Authorship Reference/E-Commerce Web Marketing. I read this book after reading the author’s ‘Let’s Get Digital’. It’s a natural follow-on for those interested in marketing their e-books as indie writers/publishers. In fact, it also has a lot to say about, and to, mainstream and some small publishers, much of which might benefit the authors …

Continue reading Amazon Decoded, by David Gaughran: #BookReview.

The Upside-Down History of Down Under, by Alison Lloyd and Terry Denton: #BookReview.

304 Pages Children’s Books (8-12) This book came to me as a ‘jokey’ present from my daughter, who lives in Australia. Whilst it’s clearly a book written for children, I suspect a lot of adults will find it informative, illuminating, and entertaining, as I did. I’d love to see it used by both UK and …

Continue reading The Upside-Down History of Down Under, by Alison Lloyd and Terry Denton: #BookReview.

Love Your Fear, by Joel Schueler: #BookReview.

I came across Joel Schueler via a post on LinkedIn. From that, I went to look at his work on Amazon and discovered ‘Love Your Fear’. As usual, I used their useful ‘Look Inside’ feature to gain an insight into the style and content. I suffered ME/CFS for ten years and, although now rid of …

Continue reading Love Your Fear, by Joel Schueler: #BookReview.

Want to Support Our Great NHS Workers?

We’re all (well, most of us, anyway) stuck at home and looking for something to pass the time in a worthwhile manner. My publisher, Fantastic Books Publishing, always gives 10% of profits to charities nominated by the authors. In this rather unusual time, he’s decided to donate funds instead to the NHS Charities Together, an …

Continue reading Want to Support Our Great NHS Workers?

The Poop Diaries, by Abby Ross: #BookReview.

237 pages Nonfiction This book is about plumbers and their experiences in the world of pipes, sewers, toilets, poo, and everything that impacts on their lives in that role. I’ll try to avoid scatological humour in this review, but I’m not promising anything! If you’ve ever had to invite or beg a plumber to unblock …

Continue reading The Poop Diaries, by Abby Ross: #BookReview.