As Long as We Remember, by Kae: #BookReview.

This fast-moving, action novel is based on a game. So, the first thing I should let you know is I’ve never played such a game. The conventions, scenarios, options and all other aspects of gaming are utterly unknown to me. I worried initially this might make the book unreadable for me, or at the very …

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Why That Title? – Convergence.

Titles for novels can cause authors a good deal of soul-searching. Ideally, we give potential readers clues about content, theme, style, and storyline. Not easy with only one to maybe a dozen words to play with. But the best titles are revealed as obvious choices once a book’s been read, so this series is largely …

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Why That Title? – Partings.

Titles for works of fiction can cause authors a good deal of soul-searching. Ideally, we want to give potential readers clues about content, theme, style, and storyline. Not easy with only one to maybe a dozen words to play with. Of course, the best titles are revealed as obvious choices once a book’s been read, …

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Killing O’Carolan, by Walt Pilcher: #BookReview.

Subtitled ‘A Mark Fairley Mystery’, this humorous novel follows the reluctant emerging PI on his journey to solve the apparently unsolvable, after his unlikely success in ‘The Accidental Spurrt’.As a parody of the genre, this will entertain those who take their crime fiction with a cellar full of salt. The O’Carolan of the title is …

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Why That Title? – Joinings.

Titles for works of fiction often cause authors a good deal of soul-searching. Ideally, we want to give potential readers clues about content, theme, style, and storyline. Not easy in anything from one to maybe a dozen words. Of course, the best titles are revealed as obvious choices once a book’s been read, so this …

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Con, by Mark P Henderson: #BookReview.

Con is a complex psychological thriller and a sequel to the author’s novel ‘Perilaus II’, but you don’t need to have read the first novel, though reading ‘Con’ will almost certainly inspire you to read its predecessor.We enter the dangerous, disturbing world of the prison here and the author takes us to the beast without …

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Why That Title? – The Methuselah Strain.

Titles for works of fiction often cause authors a good deal of soul-searching. Ideally, we want to give potential readers clues about content, theme, style, and storyline. Not easy in anything from one to maybe a dozen words. Of course, the best titles are revealed as obvious choices once a book’s been read, so this …

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The Forever House, by Linda Acaster: #BookReview

This book is very much about relationships, but in a setting with sinister undertones. The very ordinariness of happenings in the introducing chapter allows the following chapters to slowly build tension edged with something initially unknown but seemingly sinister.The book deals well with the nature of loss and grief, without a sentimental overlay and through …

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Why That Title? – Breaking Faith.

Titles for works of fiction often cause authors a lot of soul-searching. Ideally, we want to give potential readers clues about content, theme, style, and storyline. Not easy in anything from one to, say, a dozen words. Of course, the best titles are revealed as obvious choices once a book’s been read, so this series …

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Horse of the Same Colour, by Melodie Trudeaux: #BookReview.

This children’s book is a follow-up to Horse of a Different Colour, and follows the adventures of Megan, Amy, and their fiends and enemies as they encounter more strange magic, ‘swaps’, and discover another foul scheme by the loathsome O’Neill. The story begins with an unexpected encounter between Megan and Jack, the horse with which …

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Shadeward: Expiation, by Drew Wagar: #BookReview.

The story concludes. And what a conclusion! Drew Wagar has created a masterpiece with this quartet of fantasy/sci-fi books set on a distant world in a not-too-distant future. In keeping with the social structure and history of the people starring in this series, he has kept the technological aspects as brief as possible, including only …

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Shadeward: Enervation, by Drew Wagar: #BookReview.

Enervation is the third book in the Shadeward fantasy/science fiction adventure series by Drew Wagar. I read the first two in the series, Emanation and Exoneration way back in 2017, but many factors in my life and that of the writer combined to stop me reading Enervation until now. I’m now starting to read the …

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The Official Highway Code, by Dept for Transport: #BookReview.

Subtitled ‘This guide is for all road users’ this 2022 edition is the 8th revision. I read the 1969 version after learning to drive and taking my test when I was 19. I’m sure there must have been an earlier edition as I recall reading one before that test. Subsequently, I read the 1978 edition, …

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The Accidental Spurrt, by Walt Pilcher: #BookReview.

Subtitled ‘A Mark Fairley Mystery’, this parody of the whodunit will have you smiling, grinning, chuckling, and laughing out loud as the author takes you on a revealing journey with his reluctant PI.There are many characters in this humorous novel, some of whom are deliberate cardboard cut-outs to mock the worst of the genre, but …

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Rewild Your Garden, by Frances Tophill: #BookReview.

Subtitled ‘Create a Haven for Birds, Bees and Butterflies’, this lovely little book gives practical guidance on how to do just that. Written to inform simply and comprehensively, the book also gives reasons for making changes to what are often gardens artificially regimented by tradition, ideas of taste, a desire to ‘tame’ nature, or simple …

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