Books, writing, reading, words and images. I love them; do you?

The #Write #Words? Post 12

Examining Onomatopoeia and Metaphor, Simile, Collective Nouns, and adding to my Delusional Dictionary. For definitions of those, click here to read the introductory post to the series.

This week’s words: Hoot, Hot, Horde, House.

Onomatopoeia: Hoot

‘Hoot’ is word we associate with owls as a rule. But it can also describe laughter of a certain type. And there is also the well-known phrase, ‘It was a real hoot!’ meaning something caused great amusement. ‘In the shadowed silence of the sylvan scene, the hoot startled and unnerved Hermione, especially when the initiator glided with no more sound into the clearing and ruffled her auburn locks with its passing flight.’

Simile: Hot as hell

Hell, if it existed, would probably be a touch warm. But shouldn’t we find similes that don’t rely on ancient superstition for their effectiveness? What else is hot? A furnace, oven, tropical sunshine, molten lava, certain chillies, curry, that guy or gal you fancy, something trending. So, it depends on what degree of heat you wish to convey, and whether you’re looking to shock, surprise, educate, or amuse. Have a go and see what you can come up with.

Similes to avoid because they’re clichés?

As hot as hell.

Collective Nouns: Horde

This collective noun appears to be reserved for rodents and unwanted groups. Perhaps we might have a horde of whores, a horde of vandals, a horde of racists? There’s nothing to stop you using any collective noun for any grouping you think fit, but it’s probably as well to make it apposite.

horde of gerbils, gnats, hamsters, mice, rats, savages

Delusional Dictionary: House: a dwelling too expensive for the average person to buy; a source of excess income for the greedy wealthy; an unsuitable abode for the elderly prone to forgetting why they’ve climbed the stairs to another room.

For those learning English as a language, there’s a useful guide to pronunciation here, and Facebook hosts a great group you can join here.

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